Opportunity Abounds for Romance Writers

I was doing research for work, and found myself going down the romance rabbit hole. Publishers seem to be proliferating. It’s great that there are so many avenues to becoming a published author, but it’s also kind of intimidating. There’s just so much to take in. In any case, I thought I’d share some of the resources I found.

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Chapter 1: Take 2

tu_fcrukljq-renata-tupynambaAs I mentioned in my last post (which was way too long ago), I started over. I had a timeline problem. I got a bit over zealous trying to correct that problem and created a few more for myself. So I’ve already decided to scrap this new version, but in the interest of transparency, I figured I’d share it anyway.

Continue reading

Starting Over

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I once read somewhere–most likely in Stephen King’s On Writing–that if you get stuck, the problem is probably at the beginning. And boy did I get stuck…

I was having a timeline problem, and I knew I needed to start over and push everything back. So I did. And for a while, I thought that it was working. Then I realized I’d written myself into an entirely different corner.  Continue reading

Procrastination: What Happens Next?

Emilie Ogez, Flickr Creative Commons

Emilie Ogez, Flickr Creative Commons

I’ve hit a wall. I find myself going over what I’ve written–endlessly adding and subtracting–to avoid figuring out what happens next. Occasionally I eek out a few new paragraphs…but mostly, I procrastinate. I even came up with an idea for a totally different book, and have been forcing myself not to just move on to a new project.

I’m at that point where I’ve established the love interest, set up a roadblock, and now I’m figuring out how to keep it going for 40,000 more words. Part of the problem is that I instinctively hate when I feel like a story is being dragged out. When I watch old school sitcoms where a problem could be solved if the people on the show would just talk to each other, I bristle. I sigh. I turn the channel.

So how do I move the story along, keep up conflict, and not hate myself in the morning?

If I knew the answer, I wouldn’t be writing this post.

Chapter 1: I Want Your Feedback

Kenneth Garcia, Flickr Creative Commons

Kenneth Garcia, Flickr Creative Commons

Part of this project is about getting feedback from you, the reader. This is a learning process after all. I want to hear from the experts–the readers–about what they like and don’t like. How is the pacing? Are the characters likable? So here it is: Chapter 1.

Let me have it! And, please, remember to share this with your friends. The more feedback I get, the better. Continue reading

To Outline or Not To Outline

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Torley, Flickr Creative Commons

Part of the appeal of this project for me was learning to write in a more structured way. I usually just wing it, but not this time… To that end, I keep Googling things like “how to write a romance novel.” One of the top answers to that question comes from the PBS POV documentary Guilty Publishers. Romance novelist Gill Sanderson gives some tips on how to write a romance, and there seems to be a lot of outlining involved.

Considering I’ve already written a couple of chapters, I don’t think I can follow Gill’s advice to the letter, but I can take a step back and follow that first little piece of advice:

  • Write a hundred-word outline of your story. You can think about it for a week, but writing it will only take an afternoon. Establish hero and heroine, names (important!), jobs, characters. Set the time and place. Are you going to write sweet, passionate, mysterious, religious, supernatural? Decide. Last and most important, what is the problem that is keeping your hero and heroine apart?

So here it goes: Continue reading